George White

WHITE, George
George White died peacefully on August 18, 2019. He was 88 years old. His wife, Iris, predeceased him by seven months. George leaves his son Paul (Caroline) and grandsons Isaac (Maggie) and Miles. As requested by George, his remains will be cremated and there will be no service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Red Cross Canada.

George was born Weisz György in Érmihályfalva, a Hungarian village that was made part of Rumania after WW1.  In that village, he had a large and loving extended family of which he had many happy memories.  That world came to an end in May 1944; they were all deported to Auschwitz, where most of them were murdered by the Germans. George survived in this concentration camp and also Dachau until he was liberated in 1945, blind in one eye and with the other damaged. After wandering about Europe looking for his family he ended up in London, England. With the help of an uncle, he finished high school there, and earned a degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of London at the age of 23.

After marrying Iris and having their son Paul, George and his family moved to Stockton-on-Tees, where he had a job as a Nylon plant engineer with ICI. In 1958, they immigrated to Canada and George began his career with DuPont in Brockville, working first at the Nylon plant and later at the Lycra plant. In 1968, the family moved to Kingston and George went to work in the DuPont research facility there. He enjoyed his research work and was awarded several patents.  While in Kingston, George had a second job as the business manager of Iris' "Julia's Kitchen and Bath Boutique" in the Frontenac Mall.  

In retirement, George wrote a book, "My Memories of the Holocaust" which was published in both English and in Hungarian translation.  He also worked on a Weisz family tree and found relatives around the world. George and Iris enjoyed their home in Glenburnie and traveled the world visiting many exotic locales. But their greatest pleasure was found in doting on their two grandsons when they came to visit and watching them grow up to be fine young men. 

George greatly enjoyed science fiction, especially when the science was "cool" and the fictional universe consistent and reasonable. He passed his love of the genre on to his son Paul and to his grandsons.  George was a peaceful, loving man who had a strong curiosity about the world and a belief that all things could be explained, and disputes settled, by reason. He will be missed.